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Showing posts from May, 2016

HOW A MOTHER'S LOVE CHANGES A CHILD'S BRAIN

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Nurturing a child early in life may help him or her develop a larger hippocampus, the brain region important for learning, memory and stress responses, a new study shows.

Studies in human children, on the other hand, found a connection between early social experiences and the volume of the amygdala, which helps regulate the processing and memory of emotional reactions. Numerous studies also have found that children raised in a nurturing environment typically do better in school and are more emotionally developed than their non-nurtured peers.
 Brain images have now revealed that a mother's love physically affects the volume of her child's hippocampus. in the study , children of nurturing mothers had hippocampal volumes 10 percent larger than children whose mothers were not as nurturing.

we can now say with confidence that the psycho social environment has a material impact on the way the human brain develops,"said Dr. Joan Luby, The study's lead researcher and a psychi…

WITHOUT A SECURE MOTHERLY ATTACHMENT, CHILDREN'S BODIES ACTIVE A STRESS ACTION TO UNEXPECTED EVENTS

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The bond between mother and child




With the cutting of the umbilical cord, physical attachment to our mothers ends and emotional and psychological attachment begins. While the first attachment provides everything we need to thrive inside the womb, many psychologists believe the second attachment provides the psychological foundation and maybe even the social and physical buffer we need to thrive in the world.
Attachments infants and children from with other primary-care providers also affect a child's development, research shows.The nature and impact of such attachments have become a focus for researchers interested in the increase in daycare for very young children.


Social Development
Many researchers have found correlations between secure mother-infant attachment and later psychological and social development. Infants who securely attach to their mothers become more self-reliant toddlers and have a better sense of self-esteem, said Alan Sroufe, Phd, an attachment researcher at the…