Parents and Puberty



Talking to your kids About puberty

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Boys and Girls can see these changes happening to each other in some cases , they can smell them.
Its important to Talk to your child about how bodies changes -  

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Be prepared to talk to a girl about the expected events of puberty, including menstruation, when you see the first signs of breast development, or earlier if she seems ready or has questions. A boy should know about normal penile development, eretions and nocturnal emissions before age 12- sooner, if he's an early developer. And its also important to talk to your child about what's happening to members of the opposite sex.
Talking to your daughter About Puberty(puberty for girls is difficult enough without added shame)
Its seems like just yesterday you were reading " Good night Moon " to your little girl, and now - right before your very eyes she's growing into a woman. As she develops, your daughter is bound to have questions about physical and emotional changes of puberty.
As a parent, its your job to listen to her concerns and keep the lines of communication open.
How to make that happen :

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- Answer questions openly and honestly
Let your daughter know that you're available anytime to talk but also schedule time to talk
- Talk about menstruation before she get her period
Girls who are unaware of their impending period can be frightened by the girls get their first period when they're 12 or 13 years old. Others get it as early as age 9 or as late age 16
- Make it practical
Most of are interested in practical matters , like what to do if they get their first period at school.
Your daughter will appreciate concrete assistance about that.
- Offer reassurance
Girls often express insecurity about their appearance as they go through puberty. Some develop breast at a younger age or get their period early, while others may not start until they're a little older. Assure your daughter that there's huge amount of variation is the timing milestones. Everyone goes through them , but not always at the same pace.
If your child has a question, answer it honestly. If toy feel uncomfortable, need answers to questions, or are uncertain about how to have these talks with your child, ask your doctor for advice.
Remember, its important to talk about puberty - and the feelings associated with it - as openly as possible so that your kids will be prepared for the changes ahead.




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